Welcome to Manufacturing Portal


Manufacturing is a wealth creating activity for many nations. Manufacturing is the production of merchandise for use or sale using labour and machines, tools, chemical and biological processing, or formulation. The term may refer to a range of human activity, from handicraft to high tech, but is most commonly applied to industrial production, in which raw materials are transformed into finished goods on a large scale. Such finished goods may be used for manufacturing other, more complex products, such as aircraft, household appliances or automobiles, or sold to wholesalers, who in turn sell them to retailers, who then sell them to end users – the "consumers".

Welcome to Manufacturing Portal. The portal helps to connect with students and offer them opportunities for blended learning. In this page you can find the courses related to manufacturing. For all the courses, enrolment is necessary. Enrolment are manually carried out by faculty during the beginning of  the course. If you need to self enrol, please contact me for the enrolments key. 

    现有课程

    Students will learn fundamentals of conventional and non-traditional manufacturing processes and to interpret product requirements to select and/or synthesize suitable manufacturing processes. At the end of the course, a student will be able to determine the appropriate manufacturing process(es) for the product to be made, analyse the suitability of a manufacturing process to convert the raw material to designed specifications and perform cost analysis for various manufacturing process to minimize the cost of processing the material

    This course aims to introduce the concept of sustainable manufacturing to students and enables them to analyse the impact of various decisions and evaluate options in a global context that minimize the impact of manufacturing activities on society, the environment, and resources. Students would be able to identify various alternatives in design, materials and process to make informed trade-off decisions that will minimise energy use, water use and emissions during product life cycle stages.

    This course is intended to help students gain experience with 3D Printing and explore additive manufacturing as a way to cut time-to-market. 3D Printing, and other additive manufacturing techniques, are commonly used for the production of rapid prototypes. However, with the rapid decline in cost and increase in quality of 3D Printing technology there is a case to be made for low volume agile, additive manufacturing of both end products and internal manufacturing fixtures. This course will introduce students to new novel 3D Printing processes, teach Design for Additive Manufacturing best practices, and give students hands-on experience in software and hardware for 3D Printing. 


    This course describes what is meant by “sustainability” and what you need to know about this concept. It starts out broadly, outlining why sustainability is important to the world, then what it means in the context of business, and finally why it is important in your role as a designer, engineer, product specialist, or other type of product design professional.

    Students will gain a practical knowledge of various manufacturing processes in a hands-on environment through experiments and simulations. At the end of the course, a student will be able to  realize products using primary manufacturing processes, develop a practical understanding of basic manufacturing processes and capabilities of each manufacturing processes and capabilities of each, identify and rectify defects in parts and manufacturing processes related problems and analyze data from experiments performed and reach conclusions. 

    In this course, Design for Manufacturability, Design for Reliability, Design for Assembly, Design for environment, Design for Maintainability, Design for Serviceability, and Design for Life Cycle cost will be covered. DFX provides systematic approaches for analyzing design from a spectrum of perspectives. The Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) approach produces a considerable reduction in parts, resulting in simple and more reliable design with less assembly and lower manufacturing costs.  Design for Reliability (DFR) enables the designers to gain insight into how and why a proposed design may fail and identifies aspects of design that may need to be improved.  Design for Serviceability (DFS), is the ability to diagnose, remove, replace, replenish, or repair any component or sub-assembly, to original specifications, with relative ease.  In Design for Life-Cycle Cost, the activity-based cost (ABC) is a powerful method for estimating life-cycle design cost to help guide the DFSS team in decision making to achieve cost-efficient Six Sigma design in the presence of market and operations uncertainty.  The objective of Design for Maintainability is to ensure that the design will perform satisfactorily throughout its intended life with a minimum expenditure of budget and effort.  Design for the Environment (DFE) addresses environmental concerns as well as post-production transport, consumption, maintenance, and repair.